Unborn Jesus

Unborn

Jesus Holy Hour

Unborn Jesus Holy Hour Prayer Format

Frequency

The Unborn Jesus Holy Hour can be offered at any time, any day of the year. Nevertheless, a beautiful novena of Holy Hours can be offered from the day of Incarnation on March 25th, to November the 25th and attend Christmas Mass on December the 25th. Each Holly Hour represents one of nine months of Jesus in the Womb of Mary. If the Holy Hour cannot be dedicated in the middle of the week, then choosing a Friday evening or weekend closest to the 25th of a particular month satisfices the novena requirements.

O Salutaris Hostia

As on any Holy Hour, O Salutary Hostia is chant at the beginning of the exposition of the Blessed Sacrament.

The Angelus

The Angelus is prayed at the beginning of the Holy Hour to remind us of the Mystery of the Incarnation.

The Act of Consecration to Our Lady of Guadalupe

The Act of Consecration to Our Lady of Guadalupe follows next. It is a beautiful anonymous prayer that consecrate us to Our Lady of Guadalupe, patroness of the unborn children.

The Way of the Incarnation

Next, the Way of the Incarnation is recited following the same format as the Way of the Cross. It is comprised of 14 stations related to the Mystery of the Incarnation. Each station contains a brief Bible passage related to the particular station followed by a brief meditation. It is important to mention that the Way of the Incarnation an Advent prayer that concludes with the Nativity of Our Lord.

The Helper’s Litany to Jesus in the Womb

The Helper’s Litany to Jesus in the Womb is prayed after the Way of the Incarnation. This is a beautiful prayer that has its origins at Monsignor Phillip Reilly’s group call The Helpers’ of God’s Precious Infants. Each litany prayer portrays a particular deep insight of the Mystery of the Incarnation.

Tantum Ergo and the Divine Praises

Once the Helper’s Litany to Jesus in the Womb is over, as on any Holy Hour, Tantun Ergo is chanted at the end, followed by the Divine Praises and the Benediction.

Holy, Holy, Holy

After the Benediction, the Holy Hour to the Unborn Jesus concludes with the chanting of the Holy, Holy, Holy hymn as the priest leaves the altar carrying the Blessed sacrament towards the tabernacle.
Unborn Jesus
The Word was made flesh . . .  . . . and dwelt among us!
Unborn Jesus
Unborn Jesus

Unborn

Jesus Holy Hour

Unborn Jesus Holy Hour Prayer Format

Frequency

The Unborn Jesus Holy Hour can be offered at any time, any day of the year. Nevertheless, a beautiful novena of Holy Hours can be offered from the day of Incarnation on March 25th, to November the 25th and attend Christmas Mass on December the 25th. Each Holly Hour represents one of nine months of Jesus in the Womb of Mary. If the Holy Hour cannot be dedicated in the middle of the week, then choosing a Friday evening or weekend closest to the 25th of a particular month satisfices the novena requirements.

O Salutaris Hostia

As on any Holy Hour, O Salutary Hostia is chant at the beginning of the exposition of the Blessed Sacrament.

The Angelus

The Angelus is prayed at the beginning of the Holy Hour to remind us of the Mystery of the Incarnation.

The

Act

of

Consecration

to

Our

Lady

of

Guadalupe

The Act of Consecration to Our Lady of Guadalupe follows next. It is a beautiful anonymous prayer that consecrate us to Our Lady of Guadalupe, patroness of the unborn children.

The Way of the Incarnation

Next, the Way of the Incarnation is recited following the same format as the Way of the Cross. It is comprised of 14 stations related to the Mystery of the Incarnation. Each station contains a brief Bible passage related to the particular station followed by a brief meditation. It is important to mention that the Way of the Incarnation an Advent prayer that concludes with the Nativity of Our Lord.

The

Helper’s

Litany

to

Jesus

in

the

Womb

The Helper’s Litany to Jesus in the Womb is prayed after the Way of the Incarnation. This is a beautiful prayer that has its origins at Monsignor Phillip Reilly’s group call The Helpers’ of God’s Precious Infants. Each litany prayer portrays a particular deep insight of the Mystery of the Incarnation.

Tantum Ergo and the Divine Praises

Once the Helper’s Litany to Jesus in the Womb is over, as on any Holy Hour, Tantun Ergo is chanted at the end, followed by the Divine Praises and the Benediction.

Holy, Holy, Holy

After the Benediction, the Holy Hour to the Unborn Jesus concludes with the chanting of the Holy, Holy, Holy hymn as the priest leaves the altar carrying the Blessed sacrament towards the tabernacle.
The Word was made flesh . . .  . . . and dwelt among us!